News

08/29
2007

New museum wing opens up!

The new wing of the museum has officially opened! It offers a great vintage-style space, centered on two full rows of cars. Numerous displays of automobilia – oil cans, car parts, car badges – surround the cars. There are a number of display cases filled with automotive instruments, too. The finishing touch was set in place late in the afternoon on June 21, 2007, hanging a display of touring car and roadster side curtains on the far wall of the new exhibit room.

The new wing has also created a larger library area. With our recent acquisition of a large collection of historic magazines now being catalogued, a wide selection of vintage publications - such as Vanity Fair, Life, House & Garden - are now available. The library’s existing collection of automobile magazines, club publications and history books continues to grow, too.

Posted by Administrator. August 20, 2007

08/29
2007

1926 Model 243 Touring

Have you seen our 1926 Packard Model 243 touring car on display at the Ft. Lauderdale/Hollywood Airport? The car is celebrating its first anniversary in the arrival area of Terminal 1- which includes Southwest and Jet Blue airlines. Look for it on the same floor where you pick up baggage.

Be sure to look for the big Packard sign painted on the roof of the museum as your plane approaches the Ft. Lauderdale airport – we are located just to the north of the airport!

Posted by Administrator. August 20, 2007

08/29
2007

Middle School tours museum

A group from the Hollywood Middle School toured the museum just before the end of the school year in June. They were fascinated by all the Packards, of course - especially the ones parked by the canopied Texaco gas station - and also liked the special rates available for groups visiting the museum.

Posted by Administrator. August 20, 2007

08/29
2007

Exhibit Spotlight

It can be difficult to see the significance in the museum’s wide assortment of early grease caps in today’s context. But this antique device, attached to an area that needed regular lubrication, was vital to the operation of early turn-of-the-century automobiles (Our 1909 Packard Model 18 Speedster is equipped with them). One of the first steps in readying a car before driving required turning a grease cap to release lubricant. Today the application of grease is invisible from the exterior of the car, and is now an automatic function, but is just as necessary to the operation of a motor vehicle as it was 100 years ago.

Posted by Administrator. August 20, 2007